regap retired Greyhounds as pets of Connecticut
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FAQ

To help you decide if a greyhound is the dog for you, REGAP (Retired Greyhounds As Pets) of CT, Inc. has created a FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) about Greyhounds. This FAQ may help you decide if a greyhound is the proper choice for you.


What should I read before I adopt?
Are Greyhounds gray?
What kind of personality and temperament does the greyhound have?
How fast are Greyhounds?
How much exercise does a greyhound need?
I have a large, unfenced field nearby, with very few cars in the area. Is it OK to let a greyhound run loose there?
How big are Greyhounds, and how much do they eat?
Do Greyhounds have health problems?
How long do they live?
What is the difference between adopting a greyhound and another breed of dog from a shelter or breeder?
Are Greyhounds housebroken?
Will my new greyhound cope with being alone when I go to work?
I have cats.  Will a greyhound chase my cats?
I have a toddler.  Are Greyhounds good with children?
Why should I adopt a REGAP of CT greyhound?
What does REGAP of CT charge to adopt a greyhound?
Will the greyhound have been neutered or spayed, and will it have had dentistry, shots and tests?
 



What should I read before I adopt?
There is a lot of information available on the Internet and in bookstores. Many people consider Adopting the Racing Greyhound, by Cynthia Branigan required reading for potential adopters. Cynthia's book is one of the best references any greyhound owner can have, and we highly recommend it. There is also a book called Greyhounds for Dummies. We will let you know when this book is available.

Another great resource is Celebrating Greyhounds, The Magazine You can find information on subscribing to CG here.


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Are Greyhounds gray?
Actually, gray Greyhounds are rare.  A gray greyhound is officially called a “blue.”  Greyhounds come in solids, from white to black, and in patches and in brindle coloring.  They are a very colorful breed. You can find a color chart here.

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What kind of personality and temperament does the greyhound have?
Greyhounds are very sensitive and eager to please.  They are very people oriented and enjoy the company of other Greyhounds.  In general, the males tend to be excellent with children and the females tend to be more reserved.  As with other breeds of dogs, the females tend to “rule the roost.”  Greyhounds adore the company of other Greyhounds, which is why one often sees more than one greyhound in many houses.

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How fast are Greyhounds?
Very.  They run up to 45 MPH and can hit top speed in 30 feet.  For this reason, they must be kept on a leash unless they are in a fenced area, and must NEVER be placed on a cable-run or other type of tether.

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How much exercise does a greyhound need?
A greyhound appreciates a brisk walk every day.  They also enjoy a good run in a fenced area a couple of times a week.  We recommend a fenced yard for your home.

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I have a large, unfenced field nearby, with very few cars in the area. Is it OK to let a greyhound run loose there?
No.  A sight-hound, Greyhounds chase small prey, such as rabbits, squirrels, birds and even the neighbor’s cat.  They can cover many miles very quickly and will ignore your recall if they are in the middle of a chase.

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How big are Greyhounds, and how much do they eat?
Weight ranges from fifty to ninety pounds, although they average weight range of a male is sixty to seventy pounds. Many males are smaller, and many females are larger. Weight ranges from fifty to ninety pounds, although they average weight range of a male is sixty to eighty pounds and a female is fifty to sixty pounds. Many females are smaller, and many males are larger.

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Do Greyhounds have health problems?
Greyhounds have no genetic difficulties, unlike many other pure bred dogs. Greyhounds (and other sight-hounds and collies) are more sensitive to chemicals and anesthesia than other breeds of dog.  This is not a problem if the proper procedures and recommended chemicals are used, particularly flea and tick remedies.

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How long do they live?
Many Greyhounds live to fourteen, and some have been known to live beyond sixteen.

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What is the difference between adopting a greyhound and another breed of dog from a shelter or breeder?
Greyhounds, unlike other dogs, have never lived in a home.  They have never met other breeds of dogs.  Their world has been limited to the kennel setting where they have seen only their trainers and caretakers.  They need socializing with adults, children, babies and small pets.  Some dogs adjust to the outside world very quickly, while others take more time.  When you adopt a greyhound, you are getting a dog that needs to be taught about steps, windows, mirrors, small animals and children.  All these things are brand new to a greyhound, but you will be getting a gentle, clean, quiet, affectionate dog that will become very devoted to you.  If you have the desire to help a greyhound adjust to the outside world, then a greyhound will be an ideal companion for you.

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Are Greyhounds housebroken?
No.  They are crate-trained.  This means that they will not soil their crates.  If they do, it is because they are ill or anxious about something.  Most Greyhounds can be housebroken in a very short period of time.  Some will never have an accident in the house.  A vigilant owner who learns to “read the signs” of a greyhound in need of going outside will be able to train their greyhound very quickly.  Unlike groups which kennel their adoptable Greyhounds, REGAP Greyhounds generally have been in a home setting before they are adopted out.  Their adjustment has already begun before the adopters take their new greyhound home.

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Will my new greyhound cope with being alone when I go to work?
We recommend that you adopt your greyhound when you are on vacation so that you may gradually acclimate your greyhound to being alone over longer and longer periods of time.  REGAP will give you lots of tips on how to do this when you bring your new greyhound home.  Many people keep their Greyhounds in crates or a dog-proofed room while they are at work.

Most REGAP dogs are with the founder who is able to assess the dogs personality which reassures that you will be matched with the dog that is best suited for you and your lifestyle. REGAP has been successfully placing greyhounds into loving homes for over 20 years.

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I have cats.  Will a greyhound chase my cats?
The greyhound was bred as a hunter five thousand years ago.  Some Greyhounds have a keen prey drive and will chase small animals, including cats.  Some Greyhounds are afraid of cats.  After a period of educating and adjusting, the vast majority of Greyhounds live peaceably with cats and even sleep with them.  REGAP offers advice on helping your greyhound adjust to your small pets.

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I have a toddler.  Are Greyhounds good with children?
Greyhounds are much larger than infants, and even some youngsters up to the age of five.  As with any larger dog, small children must be supervised when with a large dog.  In general, if the child is good with the greyhound, the greyhound will be good with the child.

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Why should I adopt a REGAP of CT greyhound?
Unlike groups which kennel their dogs prior to adoption, most REGAP dogs have already been in a home setting before being adopted out. This reassures that you will be matched with the dog best suited for you and your lifestyle. Having been in a home setting is easiest on both the dog and the adopter because the dog has already begun the adjustment from kennel life to home life.

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What does REGAP of CT charge to adopt a greyhound?
REGAP has no source of funding other than the donations of adopters. The adoption fee depends on the degree of veterinary work that is done for the greyhound(s) being adopted.

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Will the greyhound have been neutered or spayed, and will it have had dentistry, shots and tests?
In most cases, yes, this work will be done before you take your dog home. We have made arrangements with some "greyhound-knowledgeable" veterinarians who perform this work for us. It is far more cost-effective for you if the medical work is done with one of our recommended veterinarians before you adopt.
 
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